PROMs

Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire (OMPQ) Flow

Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire flow

Introduction

The Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire (ÖMPQ) is a ‘yellow flag’ screening tool that predicts long-term disability and failure to return to work when completed four to 12 weeks following a soft tissue injury[1]. A cut-off score of 105 has been found to predict those who will recover (with 95 per cent accuracy), those who will have no further sick leave in the next six months (with 81 per cent accuracy), and those who will have long-term sick leave (with 67 per cent accuracy)[2].

The ÖMPQ predicted failure to return to work six months after compensable musculoskeletal injury in a NSW population of workers. The injuries in the study group were mixed, and the ÖMPQ was found to be more specific and sensitive for back injuries. In workers with back injuries screened at four to 12 weeks, a cut-off score of 130 correctly predicted 86 per cent of those who failed to return to work[3].

Identification, through the ÖMPQ, of workers at risk of failing to return to work due to personal and environmental factors provides the opportunity for treating practitioners to apply appropriate interventions (including the use of activity programs based on cognitive behavioural strategies) to reduce the risk of long-term disability in injured workers. Evidence indicates that these factors can be changed if they are addressed[4].

The Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire flow contains the Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire (OMPQ) questionnaire and associated calculation. After form submission, the Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire calculation is executed automatically. It's easy to extend this flow with conditional logic based on the interpretation of the Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire calculation.

Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire (OMPQ) questionnaire

Questions and Scoring

Click here to see the example questionnaire in English
Click here to see the example questionnaire in Dutch

Interpretation

A cut-off score of 105 has been found to predict those who will recover (with 95 per cent accuracy), those who will have no further sick leave in the next six months (with 81 per cent accuracy), and those who will have long-term sick leave (with 67 per cent accuracy)[2].

References

[1] Linton SJ, Boersma K. Early identification of patients at risk of developing a persistent back problem: the predictive validity of the Örebro Muscuoloskeletal Pain Questionnaire. Clin J Pain 2003;19: 80-86.\
[2] Linton SJ, Hallden K. Can we screen for problematic back pain? A screening questionnaire for predicting outcome in acute and subacute back pain.
Clin J Pain 1998; 3: 209-215.\
[3] Dunstan DA, Covic T, Tyson GA, Lennie, IG (2005) Does the OMPQ predict outcomes following a work related compensable injury? International
Journal of Rehabilitation Research 28(4), 369-370.\
[4] Linton SJ, Ryberg M. A cognitive-behavioral group intervention as prevention for persistent neck and back pain in a non-patient population: a
randomized controlled trial. Pain 2001; 83-90. van den Hout JHC, Vlaeyen WS, Heuts PHTG, Zijlema JHL, Wijnen AG. Secondary Prevention of  ork-Related Disability in Nonspecific Low Back Pain: Problem-Solving Therapy Help? A Randomized Clinical Trial. Clinical Journal of Pain 2003; 19: 87-96. Marhold C, Linton SJ, Melin L. A cognitive-behavioral return to work program: effects on pain patients with a history of long-term versus short-term sick leave. Pain 2001; 91:155-163.\
[5] Linton SJ. Understanding pain for better clinical practice – a psychological perspective. Edinburgh: Elsevier, 2005.

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